INDEX SOLUTIONS PRODUCTS SERVICES TECHNOLOGIES NEWS EVENTS CONTACT ABOUT US   LOGIN
  LATEST NEWS PREVIOUS NEWS ARTICLES AWARDS
Playing through recorded monitoring data to understand fundamental causes of error

By Simen K. Frostad, Chairman

Published in theFutureTV, August 2015



When there’s an urgent need to fix a problem, all efforts are directed at an immediate solution. You get the casualty to hospital first, and then start investigating how the accident happened afterwards.

The diagnostic information from a monitoring system is extremely valuable in identifying and isolating the problem so that technicians can fix it, but in the pressure of the moment, the fix is the only priority. With an advanced monitoring system, engineers can have a wealth of information to help them get the service running again, but what happens once the crisis is over and there’s a need to understand the root causes, to learn lessons and implement some preventive measures for the future? 

Without the same depth and breadth of information from the system that was available at the time of the error, a full insight into causes that may be deeply buried becomes more difficult after the event. But to borrow a well-worn maxim: without understanding history, we are doomed to repeat it. And when technical staff are overstretched anyway, allowing the repetition of errors that led to outages would be a very unproductive scenario, with disastrous effects on service quality to the customer.

Ideally, a high quality monitoring system would provide exactly the support needed to pinpoint and resolve errors very quickly when they happen, while also giving fully detailed information at any time after the event to assist a more considered and fundamental investigation into what happened.

To do this, it would be necessary to record the data output from the monitoring system, and be able to access it at leisure in full detail. But with the capability of looking at historical data, some new possibilities arise; principally the ability to observe a larger window of the data, and search for patterns and correlations based on that expanded view. If for example, there is a view of the data over six months, a year or more, it may be possible to detect patterns that are invisible in 48 hours’ worth of data.

Implicit in this idea is that technical staff should be able to zoom in and out of the view, so that if a pattern is visible over a longer period, detail can be expanded for any moment within that period to observe the minutiae of interactions in the data. The ability to easily relate the overview to the microscopic view is a key requirement.

But how is the mass of data accumulated from months of output to be presented in a way that doesn’t overwhelm the ability to comprehend it? Part of the answer comes from the existing visual metaphor used in non-linear editing programs for video and sound. This is the innovation introduced by Bridge Technologies at IBC, as an analysis tool for recorded historical monitoring data.

By being able to play through the data on a timeline, with all the data types displayed as separate tracks, as if they were separate instruments on a music production and editing application, technical staff have the means to re-play what happened at any point in the recorded data archive. By scaling the timeline up and down, it’s possible to see patterns over up to two years of data, or to fill the timeline view with a short moment in time, expanded to display every bit of minute detail.

In the increasingly onerous regulatory climate for broadcasters media service providers, the ability to play through up to two years of recorded data and generate reports from it is valuable for verifying loudness compliance, closed caption conformance, SCTE35 signalling, RF trending and other key parameters.

Best of all, this is an instantly familiar metaphor and a completely intuitive visual way of navigating through a complex volume of data. The visual metaphor means that operators who may not have a high degree of technical knowledge can go back and explore, understand, verify and document in complete detail what led up to errors that caused impairment or outages to the service.




NEWS
08.08.17
Bridge Technologies Reinforces Commitment to Interoperability at IBC 2017
At IBC, Bridge Technologies (Stand 1.F68) is focusing on how the company is responding to the industry requirement for maximum interoperability with ST2110 signal vendors and at the same time contributing to the AIMS, VSF, SMPTE, AES interop showcase with new analytics gear.
20.09.16
Bridge Technologies VB440-V Virtual Probe Wins IABM Award for Test, Quality Control & Monitoring
Bridge Technologies today announced that its innovative VB440-V virtual probe was chosen by the judges as the winner of the 2016 IABM Design & Innovation Awards in the “Test, Quality Control & Monitoring” category.
19.09.16
Bridge Technologies Remote Data Wall “Highly Commended” by CSI Judges
Bridge Technologies today announced that its innovative Remote Data Wall was ‘Highly Commended’ by the judges in the ‘Best monitoring or network management solution’ category of the CSI Awards at a presentation at IBC on 9 September.
07.09.16
Bridge Technologies Addresses New Classes Of User With Uniquely Portable Probe for Monitoring and Managing IP Networks
At IBC 2016, Bridge Technologies launched NOMAD, a unique, innovative and affordable tool for anyone tasked with managing, supporting and optimising IP networks and hybrid networks with RF signals.
30.08.16
Remote Data Wall (RDW) Receives IBC 2016 Innovation Award from Broadcast Beat
Remote Data Wall enables users with no special skills to create displays, extending over multiple screens in a videowall format, that deliver graphical representations of a broad range of data, significantly easing the monitoring, analysis and troubleshooting of media networks.

The OMEGA Program
FIND THE NEAREST SALES
REPRESENTATIVE PARTNER:

PARTNER NAME

COUNTRY LISTING

SITEMAP

SOLUTIONS

PRODUCTS

SERVICES

TECHNOLOGIES

NEWS/ EVENTS

ABOUT US

LOGO/PRESS

LOGIN

PARTNERS

CUSTOMERS

RESELLER




SHARE THIS PAGE




FOLLOW US